Whilst July and August were positive months for risk assets, September saw a reversal in markets, with slowing global growth. All asset classes were negative in the month of September. However, the Retirement portfolios held up well versus the peer group and internal benchmarks. In terms of total return, the portfolios remain comfortably above its Cash plus objective over the recommended investment timeframe. From an income perspective, the portfolios continue to deliver on objectives.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: This document is published by Lonsec Investment Solutions Pty Ltd ACN 608 837 583, a Corporate Authorised Representative (CAR 1236821) (LIS) of Lonsec Research Pty Ltd ABN 11 151 658 561 AFSL 421 445 (Lonsec Research).  LIS creates the model portfolios it distributes using the investment research provided by Lonsec Research but LIS has not had any involvement in the investment research process for Lonsec Research. LIS and Lonsec Research are owned by Lonsec Holdings Pty Ltd ACN 151 235 406. Please read the following before making any investment decision about any financial product mentioned in this document.

DISCLOSURE AT THE DATE OF PUBLICATION: Lonsec Research receives a fee from the relevant fund manager or product issuer(s) for researching financial products (using objective criteria) which may be referred to in this document. Lonsec Research may also receive a fee from the fund manager or product issuer(s) for subscribing to research content and other Lonsec Research services.  LIS receives a fee for providing the model portfolios to financial services organisations and professionals. LIS’ and Lonsec Research’s fees are not linked to the financial product rating(s) outcome or the inclusion of the financial product(s) in model portfolios. LIS and Lonsec Research and their representatives and/or their associates may hold any financial product(s) referred to in this document, but details of these holdings are not known to the Lonsec Research analyst(s).

WARNINGS: Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. Any express or implied rating or advice presented in this document is limited to general advice and based solely on consideration of the investment merits of the financial product(s) alone, without taking into account the investment objectives, financial situation and particular needs (“financial circumstances”) of any particular person. Before making an investment decision based on the rating or advice, the reader must consider whether it is personally appropriate in light of his or her financial circumstances or should seek independent financial advice on its appropriateness.  If the financial advice relates to the acquisition or possible acquisition of a particular financial product, the reader should obtain and consider the Investment Statement or the Product Disclosure Statement for each financial product before making any decision about whether to acquire the financial product.

DISCLAIMER: No representation, warranty or undertaking is given or made in relation to the accuracy or completeness of the information presented in this document, which is drawn from public information not verified by LIS. The information contained in this document is current as at the date of publication. Financial conclusions, ratings and advice are reasonably held at the time of publication but subject to change without notice. LIS assumes no obligation to update this document following publication. Except for any liability which cannot be excluded, LIS and Lonsec Research, their directors, officers, employees and agents disclaim all liability for any error or inaccuracy in, misstatement or omission from, this document or any loss or damage suffered by the reader or any other person as a consequence of relying upon it.

Copyright © 2021 Lonsec Investment Solutions Pty Ltd ACN 608 837 583 (LIS). This document may also contain third party supplied material that is subject to copyright.  The same restrictions that apply to LIS copyrighted material, apply to such third-party content.

According to a report in Bloomberg recently, while Vanguard data show a portfolio with 60 equities/fixed income mix returned an average 9.1% a year from 1926 to 2020, JP Morgan Asset Management recently estimated it will return just 3.7% over the next decade. Why? In a world where 85% of developed-market government bonds are yielding below 1%, the likely returns from the fixed income component of the portfolio has plunged, as shown in Figures 1 and 2.

Figure 1

Figure 2

So, this raises a question that we are getting asked by our clients – why even bother having fixed income within my portfolio?

When answering this question, it is important to think about what the reasons were for including fixed income in your portfolio in the first place.

At Lonsec, we believe that fixed income generally can play three roles in a portfolio:

1. As a diversifier to equities – bonds dampen overall portfolio volatility when held in a portfolio with riskier assets such as equities;
2. As a defensive asset that “will not go down” – so may be suitable for the risk averse investor with a primary objective being the preservation of capital; and
3. As a provider of a steady income stream – regular income payments from bonds provide a stable income stream for retirees

Figure 3 shows the rolling three year returns for global equities and global bonds and serves to highlight the relatively low volatility of global bonds compared to global equities.

Figure 3

However, when faced with the prospect of challenging returns, the reasons for inclusion tend to fall by the wayside and we start to focus on where to find better returns. As a result, we have seen many investors move out of fixed interest securities, especially longer term government bonds, in favour of equities or a taking a bar bell approach by investing in the extremes of lower quality investment grade bonds and short duration cash like securities. This is a dangerous proposition especially for those in retirement.

Becoming a victim of short-termism and negative momentum can shift your portfolio greatly to one that effectively eradicates each of those objectives we listed above. Why?

1. When we increase our allocation to equities or riskier assets, we are reducing our diversification. This will significantly increase the volatility of the portfolio.
2. Whilst the short duration assets will act has a buffer during times of market volatility, we have seen time and time again, that lower quality investment bonds will typically have their correlation to equities rise to 1 during periods of market stress and produce a very significant negative return that effectively wipes out any ‘buffering’ that the short duration assets may have provided.
3. During periods of economic stress, the stability of income from equities can change quickly. We saw this last year when many banks cut their dividends for a short period of time to ensure their books were able to withstand the changing economic landscape.
4. For retirees, unless the income provided through dividends and higher yielding fixed income securities is sufficient enough to live on, the impact of falling markets when in drawdown can be catastrophic to the long term viability of a retirement portfolio.

The question around the validity of longer duration bonds in portfolios is a valid one. Fund managers have been able to lean on these as performance enhancers as dovish central banks have overseen 20 years of falling interest rates. This, coupled with the relentless demand for safe haven assets from investors, especially during times of equity market stress, has seen abnormally high returns being achieved in this end of the market.

A fact that we all quickly forget about volatility is that with riskier assets not only do you have a greater probability of producing higher returns, you also have a greater probability of producing lower returns.

Whilst historically it has been easy to forget about fixed interest as the asset class has taken a backseat to the action packed excitement of the sharemarket, we cannot do this anymore, especially if you are approaching or in retirement. This is the stage where preservation of capital with a guaranteed income stream becomes the most important goal.

For those especially, bond investors now have three choices:

1. Take on more risk to generate higher yields;
2. Lower return expectations for the short to medium term; or
3. Accept low rates as something they cannot change.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: This document is published by Lonsec Investment Solutions Pty Ltd ACN 608 837 583, a Corporate Authorised Representative (CAR 1236821) (LIS) of Lonsec Research Pty Ltd ABN 11 151 658 561 AFSL 421 445 (Lonsec Research).  LIS creates the model portfolios it distributes using the investment research provided by Lonsec Research but LIS has not had any involvement in the investment research process for Lonsec Research. LIS and Lonsec Research are owned by Lonsec Holdings Pty Ltd ACN 151 235 406. Please read the following before making any investment decision about any financial product mentioned in this document.

DISCLOSURE AT THE DATE OF PUBLICATION: Lonsec Research receives a fee from the relevant fund manager or product issuer(s) for researching financial products (using objective criteria) which may be referred to in this document. Lonsec Research may also receive a fee from the fund manager or product issuer(s) for subscribing to research content and other Lonsec Research services.  LIS receives a fee for providing the model portfolios to financial services organisations and professionals. LIS’ and Lonsec Research’s fees are not linked to the financial product rating(s) outcome or the inclusion of the financial product(s) in model portfolios. LIS and Lonsec Research and their representatives and/or their associates may hold any financial product(s) referred to in this document, but details of these holdings are not known to the Lonsec Research analyst(s).

WARNINGS: Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. Any express or implied rating or advice presented in this document is limited to general advice and based solely on consideration of the investment merits of the financial product(s) alone, without taking into account the investment objectives, financial situation and particular needs (“financial circumstances”) of any particular person. Before making an investment decision based on the rating or advice, the reader must consider whether it is personally appropriate in light of his or her financial circumstances or should seek independent financial advice on its appropriateness.  If the financial advice relates to the acquisition or possible acquisition of a particular financial product, the reader should obtain and consider the Investment Statement or the Product Disclosure Statement for each financial product before making any decision about whether to acquire the financial product.

DISCLAIMER: No representation, warranty or undertaking is given or made in relation to the accuracy or completeness of the information presented in this document, which is drawn from public information not verified by LIS. The information contained in this document is current as at the date of publication. Financial conclusions, ratings and advice are reasonably held at the time of publication but subject to change without notice. LIS assumes no obligation to update this document following publication. Except for any liability which cannot be excluded, LIS and Lonsec Research, their directors, officers, employees and agents disclaim all liability for any error or inaccuracy in, misstatement or omission from, this document or any loss or damage suffered by the reader or any other person as a consequence of relying upon it.

Copyright © 2021 Lonsec Investment Solutions Pty Ltd ACN 608 837 583 (LIS). This document may also contain third party supplied material that is subject to copyright.  The same restrictions that apply to LIS copyrighted material, apply to such third-party content.

With half the country in what seems never ending rounds of lockdowns and pandemic fatigue setting in, one of the last things most Australians want to do is look at their Superannuation balances and investment options. That is, however, exactly what SuperRatings is wanting us to do, as neglecting your super or responding to short term market moves can have a detrimental effect on your super balance.

SuperRatings Executive Director Kirby Rappell says, ‘We looked at the impact of switching out of a balanced or growth option and into cash at the start of the pandemic and found that those with a balance of $100,000 in January 2020 and who switched to cash at the end of March would now be around $22-27,000 worse off than if they had not switched.’

This effect of switching into cash as a response to market turmoil is also seen when looking at returns over the past 15 years. In this period, a typical balanced Super option has risen substantially, with a balance of $100,000 in July 2006 accumulating to $247,557, more than doubling in size. Those members investing in a growth option have experienced an even stronger result, with a similar starting balance growing to $254,006. Share focused options have delivered the highest returns, with the median Australian shares option growing to $276,099 and the median international shares option growing to $271,051, though these types of options involve greater risks. Over the same period, a $100,000 balance invested in cash would only be worth $151,158 today.

When considering your Super options, you don’t need to go it alone as many Super funds provide advice and tools to their members. Says Mr Rappell, ‘Most funds will offer scaled advice for free or at a low cost, with members able to get advice on topics such as contributions, investment options, insurance in the fund and the transition to retirement.’ Scaled advice is general in nature so you will need to check if your situation and goals align with the advice.
Continues Mr Rappell, ‘For members who want more tailored advice, some funds will offer comprehensive advice that will also take into account your financial assets outside of superannuation.’ While there will be a cost associated with this comprehensive advice, most funds will allow the cost of the advice to be deducted from the superannuation account, just make sure you check any costs and how they can be paid before agreeing to get the advice.
Looking at more recent returns, balances continued to grow in July. The typical balanced option returned an estimated 1.3% over the month and 18.5% over the year. The typical growth option returned an estimated 1.3% for the month and the median capital stable option also increased 0.9% in the month.

Accumulation returns to July 2021

FYTD 1 yr 3 yrs (p.a.) 5 yrs (p.a.) 7 yrs (p.a.) 10 yrs (p.a.)
SR50 Balanced (60-76) Index 1.3% 18.5% 7.9% 8.4% 8.0% 8.6%
SR50 Capital Stable (20-40) Index 0.9% 7.8% 4.5% 4.5% 4.8% 5.3%
SR50 Growth (77-90) Index 1.3% 22.7% 9.2% 9.5% 8.9% 9.6%

Source: SuperRatings estimates

Pension returns were also positive in July. The median balanced pension option returned an estimated 1.3% over the month and 20.0% over the year. The median pension growth option returned an estimated 1.5% and the median capital stable option also rose an estimated 0.9% in the month.

Pension returns to July 2021

FYTD 1 yr 3 yrs (p.a.) 5 yrs (p.a.) 7 yrs (p.a.) 10 yrs (p.a.)
SRP50 Balanced (60-76) Index 1.3% 20.0% 8.4% 9.1% 8.5% 9.5%
SRP50 Capital Stable (20-40) Index 0.9% 8.6% 5.2% 5.2% 5.2% 5.9%
SRP50 Growth (77-90) Index 1.5% 24.4% 9.7% 10.3% 9.8% 10.6%

Source: SuperRatings estimates

Release ends


Warnings: Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. Any express or implied rating or advice presented in this document is limited to “General Advice” (as defined in the Corporations Act 2001(Cth)) and based solely on consideration of the merits of the superannuation or pension financial product(s) alone, without taking into account the objectives, financial situation or particular needs (‘financial circumstances’) of any particular person. Before making an investment decision based on the rating(s) or advice, the reader must consider whether it is personally appropriate in light of his or her financial circumstances, or should seek independent financial advice on its appropriateness. If SuperRatings advice relates to the acquisition or possible acquisition of particular financial product(s), the reader should obtain and consider the Product Disclosure Statement for each superannuation or pension financial product before making any decision about whether to acquire a financial product. SuperRatings research process relies upon the participation of the superannuation fund or product issuer(s). Should the superannuation fund or product issuer(s) no longer be an active participant in SuperRatings research process, SuperRatings reserves the right to withdraw the rating and document at any time and discontinue future coverage of the superannuation and pension financial product(s).

Copyright © 2021 SuperRatings Pty Ltd (ABN 95 100 192 283 AFSL No. 311880 (SuperRatings)). This media release is subject to the copyright of SuperRatings. Except for the temporary copy held in a computer’s cache and a single permanent copy for your personal reference or other than as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth.), no part of this media release may, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, micro-copying, photocopying, recording or otherwise), be reproduced, stored or transmitted without the prior written permission of SuperRatings. This media release may also contain third party supplied material that is subject to copyright. Any such material is the intellectual property of that third party or its content providers. The same restrictions applying above to SuperRatings copyrighted material, applies to such third party content.

The Retirement portfolios outperformed their respective peer group benchmark over the June quarter. From an income perspective, the portfolio continues to deliver on its objectives, generating 4.14% income (before franking) over the 12 months to June.  Pleasingly, that income has been sourced across a range of asset classes. The portfolio remains diversified by accessing a wide range of income sources from equity dividends.

Lonsec’s view remains that inflation will for the most part be transitory, nonetheless, the Retirement portfolios are well positioned should inflation turn out to be more pervasive.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: This document is published by Lonsec Investment Solutions Pty Ltd ACN 608 837 583, a Corporate Authorised Representative (CAR 1236821) (LIS) of Lonsec Research Pty Ltd ABN 11 151 658 561 AFSL 421 445 (Lonsec Research).  LIS creates the model portfolios it distributes using the investment research provided by Lonsec Research but LIS has not had any involvement in the investment research process for Lonsec Research. LIS and Lonsec Research are owned by Lonsec Holdings Pty Ltd ACN 151 235 406. Please read the following before making any investment decision about any financial product mentioned in this document.

DISCLOSURE AT THE DATE OF PUBLICATION: Lonsec Research receives a fee from the relevant fund manager or product issuer(s) for researching financial products (using objective criteria) which may be referred to in this document. Lonsec Research may also receive a fee from the fund manager or product issuer(s) for subscribing to research content and other Lonsec Research services.  LIS receives a fee for providing the model portfolios to financial services organisations and professionals. LIS’ and Lonsec Research’s fees are not linked to the financial product rating(s) outcome or the inclusion of the financial product(s) in model portfolios. LIS and Lonsec Research and their representatives and/or their associates may hold any financial product(s) referred to in this document, but details of these holdings are not known to the Lonsec Research analyst(s).

WARNINGS: Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. Any express or implied rating or advice presented in this document is limited to general advice and based solely on consideration of the investment merits of the financial product(s) alone, without taking into account the investment objectives, financial situation and particular needs (“financial circumstances”) of any particular person. Before making an investment decision based on the rating or advice, the reader must consider whether it is personally appropriate in light of his or her financial circumstances or should seek independent financial advice on its appropriateness.  If the financial advice relates to the acquisition or possible acquisition of a particular financial product, the reader should obtain and consider the Investment Statement or the Product Disclosure Statement for each financial product before making any decision about whether to acquire the financial product.

DISCLAIMER: No representation, warranty or undertaking is given or made in relation to the accuracy or completeness of the information presented in this document, which is drawn from public information not verified by LIS. The information contained in this document is current as at the date of publication. Financial conclusions, ratings and advice are reasonably held at the time of publication but subject to change without notice. LIS assumes no obligation to update this document following publication. Except for any liability which cannot be excluded, LIS and Lonsec Research, their directors, officers, employees and agents disclaim all liability for any error or inaccuracy in, misstatement or omission from, this document or any loss or damage suffered by the reader or any other person as a consequence of relying upon it.

Copyright © 2021 Lonsec Investment Solutions Pty Ltd ACN 608 837 583 (LIS). This document may also contain third party supplied material that is subject to copyright.  The same restrictions that apply to LIS copyrighted material, apply to such third-party content.

Lonsec’s managed accounts have posted the fourth consecutive month of record growth in October, adding $100m in net inflows across its broad suite of diversified, retirement and listed portfolios.

The results highlight the success of Lonsec’s research-backed managed account model, which combines Lonsec’s portfolio construction expertise with Australia’s largest investment product research team.

Lonsec CEO Charlie Haynes said more advisers were turning to Lonsec for a professional, actively managed investment solution, whether off-the-shelf or tailored to a licensee or practice’s needs.

“The success of our managed portfolios comes down to three things: our investment philosophy, the diversity of expertise on our investment committees, and our research capabilities,” said Mr Haynes.

“Our active approach to asset allocation and asset selection, coupled with our ability to identify high-quality investments based on our extensive research coverage is proving attractive to advisers.”

The growth in Lonsec’s managed accounts reaffirms the importance of knowledge as well as execution, positioning the company as a major provider of investment solutions, along with its traditional research offering.

Part of the appeal is the breadth of Lonsec’s solutions, including diversified multi-asset portfolios, objectives-based retirement portfolios, listed portfolios, and direct equity SMAs. All are underpinned by the same proven philosophy and dynamic approach to portfolio management.

“Lonsec is known for its research and investment insights advisers and investors can trust, but more and more advisers are approaching Lonsec as a one-stop-shop for their investment solution needs,” said Mr Haynes.

Lonsec will add to its suite of investment solutions with the imminent launch of its Sustainable Managed Portfolios. These draw on Lonsec’s latest sustainability research to construct high-quality, risk-managed portfolios that target sustainable themes.

“The Sustainable Managed Portfolios are a great example of how Lonsec continues to develop its offering to meet a wide range of investment needs,” said Mr Haynes.

“We want to help advisers provide a genuinely sustainable investment solution that aligns to their clients’ values and investment objectives.”

Release ends

The biggest challenge for investors in an environment such as the one we are experiencing now is that there is a lot of information, the environment is changing rapidly and there are many unknowns. In the past several weeks we have witnessed one of the fastest drops in markets in history, bond market liquidity has dried up, unemployment is rising, robust business models have unraveled with businesses such as Virgin Australia forced into administration and we have seen unprecedented levels of government stimulus. This follows an extended period where equity market returns were strong and volatility was at historically low levels.

Whether you are running an investment committee or speaking to clients in such an environment, going back to basics is warranted. Referring to your investment philosophy and the investment framework that underpins it is fundamental in periods such as this. Importantly, it will assist in avoiding making reactive investment decisions that can have an adverse impact on the long-term outcomes of your portfolios. This is particularly important in the current environment where there is a proliferation of news flow. On a client level, dusting off the investment philosophy and refocusing your client’s attention on your fundamental investment beliefs will help you deal with nervous clients and aid in preventing them from making kneejerk decisions relating to their investments.  If we cast our minds back to the GFC, we know that clients that were reactive and cashed out from a typical balanced portfolio locked in a loss of about 8.5% on average, whereas those that remained invested, benefitted from the subsequent rebound in markets.

At the core of Lonsec’s investment philosophy is our belief in a diversified portfolio approach across asset classes and investment strategies with a strong focus on risk management. We aim to do this through a combination of active asset allocation decisions focused on managing risk and active bottom-up investment selection focused on ensuring portfolio are diversified not only by asset class but also investment strategies. As a practical example, in the current environment our focus within asset allocation remains on valuation, cyclical and liquidity factors and market sentiment. This provides us a starting point for assessing the current environment.

From a bottom-up fund selection perspective, we remain focused on understanding the role that every fund plays in the portfolio recognising that during periods of severe market dislocation, our ‘risk control’ funds should provide some dampening against this volatility, whereas our ‘growth’ funds will more than likely suffer the full extent of any market moves.

The strength of having an investment framework will assist navigating through uncertain times as it helps understand performance drivers and ‘where to from here” scenarios. Additionally, it ensures that conversations we have with clients on expectations of portfolio performance are clear and easily understood.

For more information about how Lonsec can help you with your investment philosophy and process, please contact us on 1300 826 395 or info@lonsec.com.au.

What is it?

In September 2019, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg announced a long-awaited independent review of Australia’s retirement income system.

The review, recommended by the Productivity Commission, will examine the retirement income system’s ‘three pillars’ –

  • the age pension,
  • superannuation, and
  • voluntary savings, including home ownership.

The Commission urged the government to carry out the review before increasing the superannuation guarantee (SG) rate. The SG is scheduled to rise in stages to 12% by 2025.

The review provides an important opportunity to evaluate how Australia’s retirement income system is tracking and what reforms may be needed to ensure the system is both equitable and sustainable over the long term. The system needs to accommodate the challenges of Australia’s ageing population and more people entering retirement with debt or without the security of a home.

Who is undertaking the review?

The review will be chaired by former senior treasury official Mike Callaghan, a former executive director of the IMF, and will include Carolyn Kay, a director of the Future Fund, and Deborah Ralston, professorial fellow in banking and finance at Monash University and a member of the central bank’s payments system board. She is also chair of the SMSF Association but will step down while working on the review.

The final report will be provided to the government by June 2020.

What will the review consider?

The terms of reference are quite high-level and broad and could cover:

  • home ownership – the review will examine the growing number of non-home owner retirees and how people survive the private rental market.
  • the interaction between super and the age pension – whether the means test acts as a disincentive to saving given the more super you have, the less pension you get. Also, whether an income test as well as an assets test is needed (Australia has two tests, unlike most other countries).
  • superannuation tax concessions.
  • income and intergenerational equity, and
  • the cost to the federal budget.

What it won’t cover

Industry experts have pushed for sensitive issues to be probed, such as including the value of a retiree’s home in the means test for the age pension and aged care, lifting the qualifying age for the government pension and overhauling superannuation tax breaks for the wealthy. However, the government appears to have ruled out touching some sensitive parts of the system, such as including the principal place of residence in the age pension asset test and cutting generous super tax concessions.

Concerns

In general, the review has been welcomed by industry participants, however, most have warned against ‘changing the goalposts’ on legislative arrangements for Australians who have already retired and are already partly or fully self-funding their retirement.

The government has sought to ease concerns with Senator Cormann stating the inquiry will not lead to a ‘major wave of significant reforms’ and will present a fact base which will inform the public about where the system is at and how it operates.

There is also nervousness about whether the government will seek to use the inquiry to abandon its timetable for increasing the superannuation guarantee (SG) to 12% by 2025 and reduce the beneficial tax treatment of superannuation, particularly for large balance holders.

Lonsec’s view

Lonsec believes that whatever the government is seeking to achieve from the review should be revealed to the industry as soon as possible. This will help provide clarity to those product providers operating in the Australian financial services industry looking to deliver new retirement products and services but are reluctant to do so until they fully understand the changing regulatory landscape.

The timeframe for the review recommendations is mid-year, however as any changes to the retirement income system become likely, Lonsec will provide a summary of these and help make sense of the implications for advisers.

Veronica Klaus Head of Lonsec Investment Consulting spoke on a panel at the Professional Planner Researcher Forum in Sydney last week.

Veronica discussed the inconsistency and confusion around asset class definitions, which is one of the biggest issues confronting the industry. The way in which assets are defined as growth, defensive, etc. often lacks transparency and ultimately makes it harder for financial advisers to make the right recommendations for their clients.

However, as Veronica explains, the superannuation funds aren’t necessarily the ones to blame for the problem.

 

James Syme, Portfolio Manager, Pendal Global Emerging Markets Opportunities Fund

After five tough years, we think the combination of a more benign US monetary outlook and some extremely compelling valuations makes for some powerful opportunities in the emerging market (EM) domestic demand space.
We see domestic demand — the sum of household, government and business spending in an economy including imports but not exports — as the primary area of opportunity in EM, particularly after the 2018 sell-off.
We emphasise an exciting combination of supportive top-down conditions, good quality companies and attractive valuations.

India in favour
India is currently our most favoured market, despite economic growth recently falling to a six-year low.
We like a number of domestic names there including mortgage lenders. Now that the global liquidity outlook has eased, there is the prospect of the Reserve Bank of India continuing to cut rates even as Indian credit growth recovers.
India, unusually in EM, has not had a credit cycle in the last ten years, so the current pick-up in credit could be enduring.
Alongside that, India has ongoing demand for 5-10m residential units per year that need financing.

Mexico and UAE good value
Elsewhere, Mexican equities look markedly cheap relative to history, despite growth being decent, implying some excessively negative market expectations for the political environment.
We also like property stocks in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), particularly in Dubai.
Through its currency peg, the UAE effectively imports US monetary policy. Higher US rates coincided with oversupply of development properties to push real estate prices and related stocks down significantly.
As the Fed’s more accommodative stance improves financial conditions in Dubai, and helped by rising tourist numbers, the prospects for attractively valued Dubai property stocks look good.

South Korea and China
Turning to South Korea, the ongoing corporate governance revolution there is one of the main reasons for our overweight position.
China is a slightly separate story and continues to disappoint.
It has tightened monetary policy significantly in the last two years as the strength of the US dollar has put pressure on the Chinese renminbi, which has been a constraint on the People’s Bank of China’s ability to act.
Activity indicators remain soft, and we think that more stimulus through faster credit creation remains key to a recovery in China.

We’re bullish about:
• The EM domestic demand space offers an exciting combination of supportive top-down conditions, good quality companies and attractive valuations
• A more benign US monetary policy outlook

We’re bearish about:
• Potential for escalation in the US / China trade conflict
• Chinese growth continues to disappoint

Why allocate to Emerging Markets?
As cash rates head below 1%p.a. in Australia, the need for returns from growth assets to offset lower returns from income assets becomes very important for retirees. However in terms of portfolio construction, trying to improve returns without increasing risk becomes very important, due to the increased concerns of retirees around drawdowns. ‘

We believe that a discrete allocation to Emerging Market equities can assist retiree portfolios to achieve these goals because:
• Emerging markets tend to higher GDP growth than developed markets (DM) – and higher equity market returns (+2.46% pa over 20 years^)
• Despite this, emerging market countries are under-represented in most global equity portfolios
• The different growth profiles between DM and EM bring the benefits of diversification to a global equity allocation, without the need to try and time shifts between them.

Figure 1 demonstrates that a simple 50/50 split between MSCI World and MSCI Emerging Markets would have delivered a significantly higher return, at a very small increase in risk, than a purely developed market portfolio over the last fifteen years.

  • Figure 1: Risk-return profile since 1 Jan 2001

^ Calendar year performance of MSCI World and MSCI EM indices in AUD over 20 years to 31 December 2018.

Hear more about emerging markets as London-based portfolio manager Paul Wimborne of J O Hambro Capital Management presents an update in Sydney and Melbourne in November
Sydney (Nov 14)
Melbourne (Nov 12) 

DISCLAIMER
This communication has been prepared by Pendal Fund Services Limited (PFSL) ABN 13 161 249 332, AFSL No 431426 for the exclusive use of advisers and the information contained within is current as at 21 October 2019. It is not to be published, or otherwise made available to any person other than the party to whom it is provided.
PFSL is the responsible entity and issuer of units in the Pendal Global Emerging Markets Opportunities Fund (Fund) ARSN: 159 605 811 (formerly BT Emerging Markets Opportunities Fund). A product disclosure statement (PDS) is available for the Fund and can be obtained by calling 1800 813 886 or visiting www.pendalgroup.com. You should obtain and consider the PDS before deciding whether to acquire, continue to hold or dispose of units in the Fund. An investment in the Fund referred to in this presentation is subject to investment risk, including possible delays in repayment of withdrawal proceeds and loss of income and principal invested.
This communication is for general information purposes only, should not be considered as a comprehensive statement on any matter and should not be relied upon as such. It has been prepared without taking into account any recipient’s personal objectives, financial situation or needs. Because of this, recipients should, before acting on this information, consider its appropriateness having regard to their or their clients’ objectives, financial situation and needs. This information is not to be regarded as a securities recommendation.
The information in this communication may contain material provided by third parties, is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be accurate as at its issue date. While such material is published with necessary permission, and while all reasonable care has been taken to ensure that the information in this communication is complete and correct, to the maximum extent permitted by law neither PFSL nor any company in the Pendal group accepts any responsibility or liability for the accuracy or completeness of this information.
Where performance returns are quoted “After fees” then this assumes reinvestment of distributions and is calculated using exit prices which take into account management costs but not tax you may pay as an investor.

Many behavioural studies have shown there are several traits and biases that can impede us from making reasonable decisions about everything from what to eat to how to invest. Understanding these biases and considering whether they may be negatively impacting decisions can be beneficial when implementing long-term investment plans. These studies show, in general, people have asymmetric risk profiles and fear losses more than the expectation of gains by at least a 2:1 margin[1]. Interestingly, and perhaps not surprisingly, this ratio increases substantially as people approach retirement.

American psychologist and economist, Daniel Kahneman, who won a Nobel Prize for his work challenging the prevailing assumption of human rationality in modern economic theory has stated, ‘If you have an individual whose objective is to maximise wealth at a certain future point in time, then loss aversion is very bad because loss aversion will cause that individual to miss out on many opportunities.’

This loss avoidance trait stands in contrast to a basic investment principal, that investors need to accept higher risk (and higher potential for near-term losses) in order to achieve higher returns over the long term, particularly during market sell-offs. When faced with losses, rational decision-making can become impaired by the emotional desire to avoid more losses.

There are a wide range of cognitive biases that can impact retirement plans, some are listed below:

Confirmation bias

Confirmation bias is the natural human tendency to seek information that confirms an existing point of view or hypothesis. This can lead to overconfidence if investors keep seeing data that appears to confirm the decisions they have made. This overconfidence can result in a false sense that nothing is likely to go wrong, increasing the risk of being blindsided when something does go wrong.

Information bias

Information bias is the tendency to evaluate information even when it is useless in understanding a problem or issue. Investors are exposed to an array of information daily, and it is difficult to filter through this and focus on the relevant information. In general, investors would make superior investment decisions if they ignored daily share price movements and focused on prices compared to the medium-term prospects for the investments. By ignoring daily share price commentary, investors would overcome a dangerous source of information bias in the investment decision making process.

Loss aversion bias

Loss aversion is the tendency for people to strongly prefer avoiding losses than obtaining gains. The loss aversion effect can lead to poor and irrational investment decisions, where investors refuse to sell loss-making investments in the hope of making their money back. Investors fixated on loss aversion can miss investment opportunities by failing to properly consider the opportunity cost of their investments.

Anchoring bias

Anchoring bias is the tendency to rely too heavily on, or anchor to, a past reference or one piece of information when making an investment decision. For example, if you were asked to forecast a stock’s price in three months’ time, many would start by looking at the price today and then make certain assumptions to arrive at a future price. That’s a form of anchoring bias – starting with a price today and building a sense of value based on that anchor.

How do we try and overcome the biases when building retirement portfolios?

The objective based nature of Lonsec’s Retirement portfolios means there is a greater focus on absolute rather than relative performance. Additionally, the portfolios have been constructed to manage risks, including:

  • Market and sequencing risk
  • Inflation risk
  • Longevity risk

Some investment strategies that can assist in controlling for these risks include:

Variable beta strategies can vary equity market exposure by allocating to cash in periods where equity market opportunities are perceived to be limited due to expensive valuations, or where market downside risk is considered high.

Long / Short – Active Extension (also known as 130/30 funds) utilise a broad range of strategies including short selling and adjusting the net equity position for performance enhancement, risk management and hedging purposes.

Multi-asset real return funds invest in a wide range of asset classes, with the managers having considerable flexibility in the type and percentage of asset classes allocated to. Typically, these funds will seek to limit downside risk, while also targeting a real return i.e. a CPI + objective.

Real assets such as property and infrastructure, commodities and inflation linked bonds can assist in managing against inflation risk.

When constructing the Retirement portfolios, Lonsec takes a building block approach by assigning a role for each fund – yield generation, capital growth and risk control.

The yield component of the portfolios generate yield, or a certain level of income from investments that have differing risk return characteristics. The capital growth component is designed to generate long term capital growth, with limited focus on income, and is more suited to early retirees. The risk control component is critical for retirement portfolios and is designed to reduce some of the market risks in the yield and capital growth components. It is important to note that the risk control part of the portfolios will not eliminate these risks but aims to mitigate them. Asset allocation and diversification are also important ingredients in managing the overall volatility of the portfolios.

The Retirement portfolios can assist in managing the risks that impact retirees, however it is important to note that none of these strategies provide a guaranteed outcome. The range of products that offer certainty of income or capital protection such as annuities has increased in recent years, in recognition of Australia’s aging demographics and demand for greater certainty in retirement. Separate guidance on the use of annuities is available from Lonsec.

 

[1] Gachter, Johnson, Herrmann (2010). Individual – level loss aversion in riskless and risky choices. Columbia Business School

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