A year on from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, super funds continue to enjoy in the market recovery as vaccine rollouts and the return to more normal economic conditions lift confidence.

Members have welcomed the return to a more stable footing, but markets are still more volatile compared to the pre-COVID-19 situation. Much also depends on the speed and efficacy of vaccination programs globally, with some regions facing delays and logistical challenges.

According to SuperRatings data, the median balanced option rose an estimated 0.7% in February and the median growth option rose an estimated 1.1%, while the median capital stable option fell an estimated 0.1%. Over the 2021 financial year to date, the median balanced option returned 9.7%, reflecting the strength and speed of the post-pandemic recovery, which has been extended through the start of 2021.

The federal government said Australian health professionals will soon be delivering over 500,000 vaccinations a week, with general practitioners set to assist in the COVID-19 vaccine rollout in coming weeks. Australia will keep its international borders shut for at least another three months.
“Super has notched up another positive month, thanks to the vaccine narrative and the relative strength of Australia’s economic recovery, which has exceeded expectations,” said SuperRatings Executive Director Kirby Rappell.

“Markets are still bumpy and members should not be surprised to see the value of their super fluctuate over the course of 2021. With the severe shock of the pandemic now behind us, the challenge will be gradually transitioning away from government support programs and getting households and businesses back on a sustainable footing.”

Accumulation returns to end of February 2021
FYTD 1 yr 3 yrs (p.a.) 5 yrs (p.a.) 7 yrs (p.a.) 10 yrs (p.a)
SR50 Growth (77-90) Index 12.0% 7.4% 7.0% 9.2% 7.9% 8.2%
SR50 Balanced (60-76) Index 9.7% 5.9% 6.1% 8.0% 7.1% 7.6%
SR50 Capital Stable (20-40) Index 4.1% 2.0% 3.7% 4.5% 4.4% 4.8%

Source: SuperRatings estimates

Pension returns were also positive in February. The median balanced pension option returned an estimated 0.6% over the month and 10.3% over the financial year to date. The median pension growth option returned an estimated 1.1%, whereas the median capital stable option was down an estimated 0.2% through the month.

Pension returns to end of February 2021
FYTD 1 yr 3 yrs (p.a.) 5 yrs (p.a.) 7 yrs (p.a.) 10 yrs (p.a)
SRP50 Growth (77-90) Index 13.1% 7.9% 7.5% 10.1% 8.7% 9.1%
SRP50 Balanced (60-76) Index 10.3% 6.2% 6.7% 8.8% 7.8% 8.3%
SRP50 Capital Stable (20-40) Index 4.4% 2.3% 4.2% 5.2% 4.9% 5.6%

Source: SuperRatings estimates

The pace of Australia’s economic recovery was reflected in the recently released GDP figures for the December 2020 quarter, which showed growth of 3.1%, taking the yearly rate from -3.7% to -1.1%. The result marked the second straight strong quarter of growth, helped by high levels of monetary and fiscal stimulus.

The February and March earnings season revealed a corporate environment still impacted by COVID-19, with earnings down in aggregate and companies opting to hold more cash, although the lift in dividends has been a key positive development for Australian investors.
According to SuperRatings, the pandemic has been a critical case study for super funds and will inform the way they manage risks and respond to member needs into the future.

“A lot is happening in super at the moment, from regulatory change to further consolidation,” said Mr Rappell.
“Funds have shown they are able to adapt to rapid changes on these fronts, while also managing risks and attending to the needs of members through a challenging market. The pandemic period will serve as a masterclass in change management for superannuation that will lead to a more robust and agile industry in the long run.”

Release ends
We welcome media enquiries regarding our research or information held in our database. We are also able to provide commentary and customised tables or charts for your use.

For more information contact:

Kirby Rappell
Executive Director
Tel: 1300 826 395
Mob: +61 408 250 725
E: Kirby.Rappell@superratings.com.au

Across the industry, there have been significant reductions in the amount of cover and associated annual premiums for group super business, resulting from the PYS (Protecting Your Super) and PMIF (Putting Members Interests First) legislation.

Between June 2019 and June 2020, insured lives for death and TPD reduced by approximately 30%, after having remained stable since June 2018. Most of this reduction is likely to be the result of PYS. DII (Disability Income Insurance) suffered less reduction, due to the lower proportions of default DII in the industry.

Over the same period, total annual premiums for death cover reduced in line with lives insured, but TPD premiums reduced by only 3.2% (compared to 30% mentioned above). In other words, TPD premium rates per life insured increased by approximately 40%, which offset the reduction that might otherwise have occurred. Premium rates per life insured for DII risks increased by approximately 6%, but we are expecting further increases.

The general reduction in annual premiums resulting from new legislation was expected to place upwards pressure on premium rates, due to the insurers’ needs to service capital and fixed costs from a lower premium base. In addition, 2018-2020 saw a general increasing trend in disability income claims and TPD claims for mental health, which will potentially be exacerbated by the economic and social aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic, so it is likely we will see rising premiums over the next year.

Please find a condensed version of our insurance market report below:

To access a full insurance report for your fund, please contact:

Luke Guns

0408 155 505

Luke.Guns@SuperRatings.com.au

 

SuperRatings and Lonsec have announced the winners of this year’s Fund of the Year Awards, which was held virtually for the first time in the event’s 18-year history.

The Fund of the Year Award went to QSuper, which also took home the Pension of the Year Award and the Smooth Ride Award. UniSuper claimed the MySuper of the Year Award, and Sunsuper clinched the MyChoice Super of the Year Award.

The winners were announced at a virtual awards event on 29 October, broadcast live from the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney.

“It’s important to recognise the significant work that all funds have done to support their members through a very challenging year,” said SuperRatings Executive Director Kirby Rappell.
“In a highly competitive field, we decided that QSuper was the fund that performed most strongly across the key criteria of investment performance, fees, member services, financial advice and insurance, and fund governance.”

“Congratulations to the team at QSuper on a fantastic effort. It was a strong field this year and we note the high calibre of all award winners, with the quality of their offerings shining through the pandemic.”

“A lot has changed in super, and there are even more changes to come. We should always be focused on improvement, but we shouldn’t lose sight of the incredible outcomes being produced by a large number of funds, both for their members and the retirement system as a whole. Despite the uncertainty, there is every reason to be positive about super.”

 

Congratulations to all of the finalists for this year’s SuperRatings and Lonsec Fund of the Year Awards Dinner. A full list of the awards is available below.

SuperRatings Fund of the Year Award

Winner

QSuper
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

SuperRatings MySuper of the Year Award

Awarded to the fund that has provided the Best Value for Money Default Offering.

Winner
UniSuper

Finalists
AustralianSuper
BUSSQ
CareSuper
Cbus
Equip
HESTA
QSuper
Sunsuper
TelstraSuper
UniSuper

SuperRatings MyChoice Super of the Year Award

Awarded to the fund with the Best Value for Money Offering for Engaged Members.

Winner
Sunsuper

Finalists
AustralianSuper
Aware Super
Hostplus
Mercer Super Trust
NGS Super
QSuper
Statewide Super
Sunsuper
Tasplan
UniSuper

SuperRatings Pension of the Year Award

Awarded to the fund with the Best Value for Money Pension Offering.

Winner
QSuper

Finalists
AustralianSuper
Aware Super
BUSSQ
Cbus
HESTA
Hostplus
QSuper
Sunsuper
TelstraSuper
UniSuper

SuperRatings Career Fund of the Year Award

Awarded to the fund with the offering that is best tailored to its industry sector.

Winner
Cbus

Finalists
BUSSQ
Cbus
HESTA
Mercy Super
TelstraSuper
Hostplus

SuperRatings Momentum Award

Awarded to the fund that has demonstrated significant progress in executing key projects that will enhance its strategic positioning in coming years.

Winner
Aware Super

Finalists
Aware Super
Cbus
Equip
HESTA
Mercer Super Trust
Sunsuper

SuperRatings Net Benefit Award

Awarded to the fund with the best Net Benefit outcomes delivered to members over the short and long term.

Winner
AustralianSuper & HESTA

Finalists
AustralianSuper
Cbus
HESTA
Hostplus
QSuper
UniSuper

SuperRatings Smooth Ride Award

Awarded to the fund that has best weathered the ups and downs of the market, while also delivering strong outcomes.

Winner
QSuper

Finalists
AustralianSuper
Aware Super
BUSSQ
CareSuper
Cbus
QSuper

Infinity Award

Awarded to the fund most committed to addressing its environmental and ethical responsibilities.

Winner
Local Government Super

Finalists
Australian Ethical Super
CareSuper
Christian Super
Future Super
HESTA
Local Government Super

Lonsec Investment Option Award

Seeks to recognise and highlight the work of asset managers and key players incorporating ESG.

Winner
CareSuper – Sustainable Balanced

Finalists
CareSuper – Sustainable Balanced
Cbus – Growth (Cbus MySuper)
Suncorp Multi-Manager Growth
Sunsuper for Life – Balanced

 

Release ends

Watch the webinar recording.

Synopsis

Super funds are on track to stage a remarkable comeback in the second half of 2020. But there are still a host of challenges facing funds, including early access, market volatility, insurance claims, and ongoing regulatory uncertainty.

Join Kirby Rappell, Executive Director of SuperRatings, as we examine how funds are positioned to manage these challenges through 2020 and beyond.

Key takeaways:

• Get insight into trends across fees, insurance, asset allocation, and member servicing, based on the most in-depth bench-marking data available.
• Assess the major market themes affecting super fund portfolios through the 2020 pandemic and how trustees are responding.
• Learn how consolidation is impacting the super industry and what funds need to do to keep their offering competitive.
• Understand the key tests of tomorrow for super funds and how advisers can assess and compare super fund offerings to meet their best interest duty.


Any advice that SuperRatings provides is of a general nature and does not take into account an individual’s financial situation, objectives or needs. Because the information that SuperRatings receives about superannuation and pension financial products is from a number of sources, it is not guaranteed to be completely accurate. Because of this, individuals should, before acting on the information, consider its appropriateness having regard to their own financial objectives, situation and needs and if appropriate, obtain personal financial advice on the matter from a financial adviser. Before making a decision regarding any financial product, individuals should obtain and consider a copy of the relevant Product Disclosure Statement from the financial product issue.

If the May 2019 Budget was all about back to black, this year’s Budget is all about rescuing and repairing the economy.  

Last year’s Budget forecast a small surplus of 0.4% of GDP in 2019-20, the first surplus since the GFC. In fact, a small surplus of 0.4% of GDP was indeed achieved in 2018-19, but budget deficits as large as -4.7% was forecast for 2019-20, and -10.2% for 2020-21. This compares to the -3.7% deficit at the height of the GFC, making it the deepest since World War II. 

Budget net operating balance (% GDP) 


Source: Treasury, Lonsec
 

How did we get here? 

We’ve had a tumultuous year since last year’s Budget, with bush fires, drought, and a global pandemic. Those negative shocks sank our economy into the first recession since 1991, with GDP contracting 7% in the June quarter. 

With reduced economic activity, tax receipts have reduced. Income taxes collected have fallen on the back of lower employment and hours worked. Company tax receipts have also fallen as many businesses remain shut or operate below capacity. GST revenue declined too, with fewer sales of goods and services. Tax receipts fell across the boardwith the one notable exception being—perhaps appropriately—taxes on the sale of spirits. 

Commonwealth revenue and expenses (% GDP) 


Source: Treasury
 

On the spending side, the government has put in place significant stimulatory measures to support the economy and employment. These include: 

  • $120 billion over 2019-20 and 2020-21, primarily for the JobKeeper payment. 
  • $46 billion mainly in the Coronavirus Supplement, economic support payments to households, and increased JobSeeker payment. 
  • $40 billion to provide further support for apprentices, trainees, hospitals, aviation, and the infrastructure sector. 


S
ource: Budget papers 

Overall, compared to the government’s Economic and Fiscal Update in July 2020, where a small surplus of $12 billion was forecast for 2020-21 (0.6% of GDP), this Budget shows an estimated deficit of $198 billion (-10.2% of GDP). Contributing the most to the deterioration is around $127 billion in additional spending, followed by $42 billion less in expected revenue due to reduced economic activity. 

How are we going to pay for all this?  

The short answer is, with debt. And a lot of it. Commonwealth Government net debt is forecast to rise to 36% of GDP in 2020-21, and even further to 43.8% in 2023-24. This compares to 19% in 2018-19. 

This may sound high, but by international standards Australia’s net government debt level is relatively manageable. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the average net debt level among developed economies was 43% of GDP. The US and UK both had net debt of around 77% of GDP, while Japan had the highest at 155% of GDP. Ratings agency S&P has confirmed Australia’s AAA rating with negative outlook, with Fitch and Moody’s reserving judgement for now.  

With interest rates at historic lows, financing the debt should be a secondary consideration, with the primary focus being to get the economy back on track 

What are the key Budget measures? 

  • $26.7 billion temporary investment tax incentives: Businesses with aggregated annual turnover of under $5 billion can deduct the full cost of eligible capital assets acquired from 6 October 2020 and first used or installed by 30 June 2022. 
  • $17.8 billion of income tax cut: Bringing forward the second stage of the Personal Income Tax Plan by two years to 1 July 2020 as well as a one-off additional benefit from the low and middle income tax offset in 2020-21. 
  • $15.6 billion in additional spending on the JobKeeper Payment: Eligibility has been expanded largely In light of the prolonged restrictions in Victoria. 
  • $10.7 billion in infrastructure spending: Including $6.7 billion in grants to the states, $3 billion for roads and community infrastructure, and $1 billion for water infrastructure. 
  • $4 billion for a JobMaker Hiring CreditTo give businesses incentives to take on additional employees aged between 16 and 35. 
  • Additional measures: Including $1.2 billion to support 100,000 new apprentices and trainees with a 50% wage subsidy and undoing $2 billion cuts to R&D incentives. 

When will we get out of the recession? 

The Treasury forecasts economic activity to pick up from late 2020 and into early 2021. The recovery is expected to be driven by a further easing of restrictions and improvements in business and consumer confidence. Economic activity will be further supported by Government stimulatory measures, both fiscal and monetaryThe RBA has also hinted at further easing, with another rate cut or announcement of further QE widely expected at its November meeting 

The IMF in its June 2020 World Economic Outlook forecast Australian GDP to decline by -4.5% in 2020 before rising by 4% in 2021. While this is our first recession since 1991, Australia’s experience with containing the virus outbreak means the economic is faring relatively well by international standards. For example, the IMF forecast US GDP to contract by -8% in 2020, -10.2% in the UK, and -12.8% in Italy and Spain. 

Yesterday’s Budget forecasts GDP to fall by -3.75%better than the IMF forecastbefore growing by 4.25% in 2021. It also forecasts unemployment to peak at 8% in the December quarter of 2020, before falling to 6.5% by June 2022 as economic activity recovers. Both the GDP and unemployment forecasts are more optimistic than many leading economists believe. 

While the COVID-19 pandemic should be a severe but temporary shock, the path to recovery remains a gradual and uncertain process. This Budget has taken important steps to support the economic recovery, but the speed and magnitude will depend on many other factors, including international health and economic outcomes, as well as domestic business and consumer confidence. 

Broad measures such as income tax cuts and investment allowance will support overall business and consumer confidence, but more targeted measures might be welcomed by more severely affected sectors such as education and tourism. The government also failed to take the opportunity to enact structural reforms such as reforming the tax system or improving overall labour productivity, which would benefit economic growth in the long term. 

Issued by Lonsec Research Pty Ltd ABN 11 151 658 561 AFSL 421 445 (Lonsec). Warning: Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. Any advice is General Advice without considering the objectives, financial situation and needs of any person. Before making a decision read the PDS and consider your financial circumstances or seek personal advice. Disclaimer: Lonsec gives no warranty of accuracy or completeness of information in this document, which is compiled from information from public and third-party sources. Opinions are reasonably held by Lonsec at compilation. Lonsec assumes no obligation to update this document after publication. Except for liability which can’t be excluded, Lonsec, its directors, officers, employees and agents disclaim all liability for any error, inaccuracy, misstatement or omission, or any loss suffered through relying on the document or any information. ©2020 Lonsec. All rights reserved. This report may also contain third party material that is subject to copyright. To the extent that copyright subsists in a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material. Any unauthorised reproduction of this information is prohibited. 

Super funds have started the new financial year with some positive momentum but face a period of stark uncertainty as Australian cases of Covid-19 rise and Victoria enters harsher lockdown conditions.

While we have seen stabilisation in markets, they remain vulnerable to further shocks, while super fund performance is contingent on how communities and economies cope with further waves of infections.

According to estimates from leading superannuation research house SuperRatings, the median balanced option returned 0.9% in July as markets continued to rebuild following March’s falls. Overall, super funds have made it through in good shape but are preparing for more market ups and downs through the rest of the 2020 calendar year.

“The outlook is still unclear but based on recent performance super funds have shown they can weather the Covid-19 storm,” said SuperRatings Executive Director Kirby Rappell.

“Looking at SuperRatings’ balanced option index, the sector is 4.0% below where it was at the start of 2020. This is less than ideal for members, but thanks to the recovery we saw over the June quarter we have already made up a lot of ground. Hopefully this momentum can continue, and members can swiftly regain their super wealth.”

According to SuperRatings’ estimates, the median balanced option is down 1.2% over the 12 months to July. The median growth option is estimated to have fallen -1.7% while the median capital stable option is steady at 0.5%.

Accumulation returns to end of July 2020

  CYTD 1 yr 3 yrs (p.a.) 5 yrs (p.a.) 7 yrs (p.a.) 10 yrs (p.a)
SR50 Growth (77-90) Index -5.1% -1.7% 5.8% 5.9% 7.7% 7.8%
SR50 Balanced (60-76) Index -4.0% -1.2% 5.5% 5.3% 6.9% 7.4%
SR50 Capital Stable (20-40) Index -0.9% 0.5% 3.7% 3.8% 4.6% 5.1%

Source: SuperRatings estimates

Pension returns have performed more or less in line with accumulation returns over the past year. The median balanced pension option is estimated to have fallen 1.2% over the 12 months to July, compared to a drop of 1.9% from the median growth option and a modest rise of 0.5% from the median capital stable option.

Pension returns to end of July 2020

  CYTD 1 yr 3 yrs (p.a.) 5 yrs (p.a.) 7 yrs (p.a.) 10 yrs (p.a)
SRP50 Growth (77-90) Index -5.6% -1.9% 6.5% 6.7% 8.5% 8.7%
SRP50 Balanced (60-76) Index -4.1% -1.2% 6.0% 6.0% 7.5% 8.1%
SRP50 Capital Stable (20-40) Index -1.0% 0.5% 4.3% 4.3% 5.1% 5.8%

Source: SuperRatings estimates 

July’s results represent the fourth month in a row of positive returns for super, following the 9.2% drop members experienced in March. While the results are promising, there is still a way to go before members recoup their losses, and the Covid-19 situation in Australia remains precarious as other states brace for potential spikes in infections.

“We can certainly take heart from recent performance, but we should not underestimate the challenge that we still face,” said Mr Rappell.

“Markets are incredibly difficult to navigate at the moment. Globally, we are seeing a disconnect between the rise in share valuations and the weakness in economic data. Meanwhile, the low yield environment will only be exacerbated by governments issuing more debt to shore up budgets and continue providing support to those affected by the virus.”

Growth in $100,000 invested over 15 years to 30 July 2020

Source: SuperRatings estimates

Taking a long-term view, super returns have done an incredible job at accumulating wealth for retirees over a period that includes two major financial and economic crises. According to SuperRatings’ data, since July 2005, a starting balance of $100,000 would now be worth $235,877 for members in a balanced option. For a growth option this would be slightly higher at $236,235. A member with full exposure to Australian shares would have seen their balance growth to $254,188. In contrast, returns on cash would have seen the balance grow to only $157,939.

 

SuperRatings Executive Director Kirby Rappell shares the latest performance results for superannuation funds and the future outlook for the industry.

Members should be prepared for more ups and downs. However, a patient approach has paid off for members over the long term with the median balanced style fund returning 7.0% per annum since the introduction of superannuation in 1992.

 

 

 


Any advice that SuperRatings provides is of a general nature and does not take into account an individual’s financial situation, objectives or needs. Because the information that SuperRatings receives about superannuation and pension financial products is from a number of sources, it is not guaranteed to be completely accurate. Because of this, individuals should, before acting on the information, consider its appropriateness having regard to their own financial objectives, situation and needs and if appropriate, obtain personal financial advice on the matter from a financial adviser. Before making a decision regarding any financial product, individuals should obtain and consider a copy of the relevant Product Disclosure Statement from the financial product issue.

There are plenty of fund managers who claim environmental, social and governance (ESG) credentials, but how many of them are actually the real deal?

When clients approach advisers looking to specifically invest in ESG, the problem has been distilling the true-to-label ESG players from those which only tick some of the boxes. Unfortunately, the objectives of investors are not necessarily identical to those of the fund managers.

There have always been ‘pretenders’ in the mix when it comes to ESG managers, but part of the issue is that mum and dad investors view ESG very differently to professional fund managers.

Confusion partly arises due to the different approaches to ESG, and this is where a gap in understanding arises. Often, when institutional fund managers discuss ESG, they are talking about a different thing to what regular investors might have in mind they think about how environmental, social and governance factors are incorporated into a portfolio.

Generally, when funds talk about ESG, they are looking at it through an investment prism – i.e. what will the ESG risk do to the value of a particular company?

However, when the mum and dads are looking at this, they are concerned about the ESG risks as they pertain to them, and what these mean for their community, planet and grandchildren. The bottom line is that the perspective the institutional fund managers and the mum and dad investors have may be quite different, and part of the adviser’s job is to work through this discrepancy and ensure their clients are investing in products that meet their expectations.

In order to do this, advisers and their clients need to understand the underlying investments of individual products and be able to make assessments and comparisons based on objective criteria. This is why Lonsec has been working with advisers to develop a new suite of research that is designed to give advisers and end investors the ability to identify investments that align with an investor’s values.

Under the new regime, all funds covered by Lonsec are issued with a sustainability score, which reflects the underlying investments of individual products and their compatibility with the United Nation’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The research is provided in partnership with Sustainable Platform, a leading provider of sustainability data for investment managers and institutions.

There is growing awareness among investors of the importance of considering sustainability issues when constructing a portfolio. Advisers are now typically confronted with the question: ‘What am I really invested in?’ It’s essential that advisers are in a position to not only answer this question, but to create a portfolio that is truly aligned to their client’s preferences.

Under Lonsec’s new approach, a Sustainability Report is issued for each fund that undergoes assessment – a two-page document detailing the relative success of the fund in supporting the SDGs, together with any exposure to the 10 controversial industries. The Lonsec Sustainability Score reflects the net impact of these measures, which is peer ranked and results in a score of between one and five bees.

There are certainly a lot of traditional fund managers who have very good ESG processes, and they do understand the risks. However, if they feel the market is compensating investors sufficiently for these risks, they’ll take them. This is because they’re thinking about it in terms of the future value of a firm, but they’re not necessarily thinking about the risk to the future of the planet.

So there are certainly companies and funds that will be assessed very strongly by Lonsec as ESG managers because they do the work, understand the risks, and engage with companies, but that doesn’t mean that their portfolios will align with what investors are looking for.

Hence the need for a new way of assessing sustainability. This new approach is crucial in order to determine what is really going on behind the ‘sustainable’ and ‘ESG’ labels. That is what Lonsec has tried to do – we’ve tried to separate the way ESG is implemented and how fund managers think about it in terms of the investing process from what clients expect and care about.

This means looking beyond the marketing stories that managers are trying to tell. Instead, we need to assess portfolios based not only on what a particular company is, but what it makes (i.e. its products and services) and how are they used.

By mapping these activities to the SDGs and controversial industries, and distilling this into a single score, we hope to give advisers the tools and information they need to make investment decisions that genuinely align with their clients’ values. We also wanted to present this information in a way that allows advisers to clearly demonstrate how their investment selection is helping them contribute to a better world.

ESG is not a redundant process – far from it. If investors understand what ESG products are trying to achieve and how they work, then they may find these products valuable. However, we need to enable advisers to have these conversations with clients and fund managers so that investors can make informed decisions. That’s a goal we hope everyone can support.

 

Kirby Rappell (Executive Director, SuperRatings) reveals insights into the superannuation landscape, based on SuperRatings’ latest benchmark report. It incorporates comments on the current market conditions, as well as the initiative to permit the early release of superannuation and the fund merger environment. A consistent theme of this year’s report is the state of flux being observed, coupled with pressures from regulatory and compliance initiatives, as well as COVID-19 impacts. Thoughts around the future outlook and key areas of focus for providers as they navigate the current environment are also provided.

 


Any advice that SuperRatings provides is of a general nature and does not take into account an individual’s financial situation, objectives or needs. Because the information that SuperRatings receives about superannuation and pension financial products is from a number of sources, it is not guaranteed to be completely accurate. Because of this, individuals should, before acting on the information, consider its appropriateness having regard to their own financial objectives, situation and needs and if appropriate, obtain personal financial advice on the matter from a financial adviser. Before making a decision regarding any financial product, individuals should obtain and consider a copy of the relevant Product Disclosure Statement from the financial product issuer. © 2020 SuperRatings Pty Ltd ABN 95 100 192 283 AFSL 311880


Lonsec’s experts look at four key themes we believe every financial adviser needs to understand to help their clients weather the storm and be in the best position possible to take advantage of future market conditions.

Bonds

Lukasz de Pourbaix, Executive Director & Chief Investment Officer

Providing insight into current market dynamics and performance-driven by historically high levels of volatility and tight liquidity conditions

Equities

Danial Moradi, Portfolio Manager Listed-Products

An overall update on the banking sector, focusing on the future of dividends in the current environment and a look into what the future may hold.

Performance of portfolios

David Wilson, Senior Investment Consultant

A summary of the overall performance of Lonsec’s managed accounts, including a deeper dive into the underlying strategies used and drivers of returns at the security selection level.

Dynamic Asset Allocation

Brook Sweeney, Senior Investment Consultant

Insight into Lonsec’s dynamic asset allocation process and the valuation, cycle, policy, and momentum factors that drive decision making.

 


This information is provided by Lonsec Investment Solutions as a corporate authorised representative of Lonsec Research Pty Ltd who holds an AFSL number 421445. This is general advice, which doesn’t consider your personal circumstances. Consider these and always read the product disclosure statement or seek professional advice prior to making any decision about a financial product. You can access a copy of our financial services guide at lonsec.com.au

This video is provided by Lonsec Investment Solutions Pty Ltd ACN 608 837 583, a Corporate Authorised Representative (CAR 1236821) (LIS) of Lonsec Research Pty Ltd ABN 11 151 658 561 AFSL 421 445 (Lonsec Research). LIS creates the model portfolios it distributes using the investment research provided by Lonsec Research but LIS has not had any involvement in the investment research process for Lonsec Research. LIS and Lonsec Research are owned by Lonsec Holdings Pty Ltd ACN 151 235 406. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. This is general advice, which doesn’t consider your personal circumstances. Consider these and always read the product disclosure statement or seek professional advice prior to making any decision about a financial product. While care has been taken to prepare the content of this video, LIS makes no representation or warranty to the accuracy or completeness of the information presented, which is drawn from public information not verified by LIS. The information contained in this video is current as at the date of publication. Copyright © 2020 Lonsec Investment Solutions Pty Ltd ACN 608 837 583

Important information: Any express or implied rating or advice is limited to general advice, it doesn’t consider any personal needs, goals or objectives.  Before making any decision about financial products, consider whether it is personally appropriate for you in light of your personal circumstances. Obtain and consider the Product Disclosure Statement for each financial product and seek professional personal advice before making any decisions regarding a financial product.